The Sports Medicine Center

Expertise in All Sports Medicine Conditions & Procedures

Sports Medicine

Since being founded in 1984, Boston Orthopaedic & Spine has been one of the premier orthopedic practices for care of athletes andweekend warriors in the Boston-area. Our 4 fellowship-trained sports medicine physicians have over (60) years of experience providing cutting-edge treatments and performing advanced surgical procedures. Our compassionate team of professionals uses a multi-disciplinary approach to ensure the most advanced treatment for all your sports-related injuries. Just as every athlete focuses on his or her particular sport, our team is dedicated to sports medicine, and this ensures the best possible care and outcome.

We understand your desire to get back into the game, and will do everything we can to make that happen safely. Because of their dynamic nature, sports injuries require specialized methods of treatment. So, whether you’re a weekend warrior or a high school, college, or professional athlete, if you suffer an injury, you need to see a physician with the highest level of experience. Regardless of the injury or level of competition, the Boston Orthopaedic & Spine team is focused on a single goal: getting you back in the game.

COMMON SPORTS-RELATED CONDITIONS

Boston Orthopaedic & Spine has specialists that have advanced training and expertise in all area of orthopedics, including: hip, knee, spine, shoulder & elbow, hand & wrist, foot & ankle. As a well-respected group with real-world experience, we can treat all of your orthopedic needs:

UPPER EXTREMITY

  • Rotator Cuff tear
  • Biceps/Superior Labrum injuries
  • Shoulder instability
  • Shoulder (AC) separation
  • Shoulder arthritis
  • Frozen shoulder
  • Tennis elbow
  • Golfer’s elbow
  • Elbow instability
  • Wrist sprains & strains
  • Hand & finger injuries
  • Fractures

 

LOWER EXTREMITY

  • Hip labral tear
  • Femoroacetabular impingement
  • Hip bursitis
  • ACL injuries
  • PCL injuries
  • MCL/LCL injuries
  • Cartilage injuries
  • Meniscus tears
  • Patellar and Quad tendon tears
  • Tendonitis
  • Ankle sprains
  • Fractures

OUR SERVICES INCLUDE:

  • Advanced X-rays, and access to MRI, CT and ultrasound diagnostic imaging
  • Chiropractic treatment
  • Massage therapy
  • Concussion evaluation and management
  • Sports Psychology
  • Education and training for coaches, trainers and students
  • Injections
  • Injury prevention
  • Physical therapy and rehabilitation
  • Pre-screening athletic physicals
  • Surgery – Minimally invasive techniques, advanced ligament and tendon reconstruction, cartilage repair and restoration, bone and soft tissue repair and reconstruction
  • Team physician and athletic trainer event coverage for professional, college and high school teams, triathlons, marathons and local sporting events
KNEE ARTHROSCOPY

WHAT IS ARTHROSCOPIC KNEE SURGERY

In the late 1970s and early 1980s, arthroscopic surgery became popular, especially in the sports world, as fiber-optic technology enabled surgeons to see inside the body using a small telescope, called an “arthroscope,” which projects an image to a television monitor. Thanks to ongoing improvementsmade by technology leaders like Smith & Nephew, arthroscopic surgeryis now accessible to more people than just professional athletes. Infact, active patients all over the world have experienced the benefits ofminimally invasive surgical procedures.

Arthroscopy may be used for a variety of knee joint conditions, includinga torn meniscus, loose pieces of broken cartilage in the joint, a torn ordamaged anterior or posterior cruciate ligament (ACL/PCL), an inflamed ordamaged synovium (the lining of the joint), or a malalignment of the patella(knee cap).

Through an incision the width of a straw tip, your surgeon is able to inserta scope, which allows him or her to inspect your joint and locate the sourceof your pain. The scope can also help identify tears or other damage thatmay have been missed by an X-ray or MRI. Your surgeon will then make oneor more small incisions to accommodate the instruments used to repairthe knee. These instruments can shave, trim, cut, stitch, or smooth thedamaged areas.

Arthroscopic knee surgery is often performed in an outpatient surgerycenter, which means no overnight hospital stay is required. Patients reportto the surgical center in the morning, undergo the procedure, and -following a recovery period under the care of medical professionals – returnhome later in the day.

Postoperative Care

After surgery, you will be transported to the recovery room for closeobservation of your vital signs and circulation. You may remain in therecovery room for a few hours.

When you leave the hospital, your knee will be covered with a bandage,and you may be instructed to walk with the assistance of crutches. You alsomay be instructed to ice or elevate your knee.

Your surgeon will likely provide further details regarding postoperative carefor your specific procedure.

Rehabilitation

Steps for rehabilitation following a meniscus repair or an ACL procedurevary from physician to physician. To learn what activities will be involved inyour own rehabilitation, consult your orthopedic specialist.

All information provided on this website is for information purposes only. Every patient’s case is unique and each patient should follow his or her doctor’s specific instructions. Please discuss nutrition, medication and treatment options with your doctor to make sure you are getting the proper care for your particular situation. If you are seeking this information in an emergency situation, please call 911 and seek emergency help.

HIP ARTHROSCOPY

In the late 1970s and early 1980s, arthroscopic surgery became popular, especially in the sports world, as fiber optic technology enabled surgeons to see inside the body using a small telescope, called an “arthroscope,” which projects an image to a television monitor.

Thanks to ongoing improvements made by technology leaders like Smith & Nephew Endoscopy, the benefits of arthroscopic surgery for knee and shoulder conditions have been experienced by patients all over the world. By adopting techniques and instruments similar to those used in knee and shoulder procedures, arthroscopic hip surgery has become a more widelyused treatment option for those who suffer from hip pain.

Arthroscopic procedures may be used for a variety of hip conditions, primarily the treatment of labral tears, hip impingement, articular cartilage injuries, and the removal of loose bodies in the joint. Other less frequent conditions treated through hip arthroscopy include tendon or ligament injuries, hip instability, and an inflamed or damaged synovium. Because all of these conditions may eventually lead to hip arthritis, treating them with arthroscopic procedures may be a beneficial option for patients.

Through an incision the width of a straw tip, your surgeon is able to insert a scope, which allows him or her to inspect the joint and locate the source of your pain. Your surgeon will then make one or more small incisions to accommodate the instruments used to treat the hip. These instruments can shave, trim, cut, stitch, or smooth the damaged areas.

Arthroscopic hip surgery is usually performed in an outpatient surgery center, which means no overnight hospital stay is required. You report to the surgical center in the morning, undergo the procedure, and – following a recovery period under the care of medical professionals – return home later in the day.

Postoperative Care

After surgery, you will be transported to the recovery room for close observation of your vital signs and circulation. You may remain in the recovery room for a few hours.

The condition being treated will determine whether or not you will be required to use crutches when you leave the hospital and the length of time that the crutches may be necessary. Your physician will provide specific information regarding your own postoperative plan.

Rehabilitation

Steps for rehabilitation following arthroscopic hip surgery vary from
physician to physician. To learn what activities will be involved in your own
rehabilitation, consult your physician.

All information provided on this website is for information purposes only. Every patient’s case is unique and each patient should follow his or her doctor’s specific instructions. Please discuss nutrition, medication and treatment options with your doctor to make sure you are getting the proper care for your particular situation. If you are seeking this information in an emergency situation, please call 911 and seek emergency help.

SHOULDER ARTHROSCOPY

WHAT IS ARTHROSCOPIC SHOULDER SURGERY?

In the late 1970s and early 1980s, arthroscopic surgery became popular, especially in the sports world, as fiber-optic technology enabled surgeons to see inside the body using a small telescope, called an “arthroscope,” which projects an image to a television monitor. Thanks to ongoing improvements made by technology leaders like Smith & Nephew, arthroscopic surgery is now accessible to more people than just professional athletes. In fact, active patients all over the world have experienced the benefits of minimally invasive surgical procedures.

Through an incision the width of a straw tip, your surgeon is able to insert an arthroscope that allows him or her to inspect your joint and locate the source of your pain. The arthroscope can also help visualize tears or other damage that may have been missed by an X-ray or MRI. Your surgeon will then make one or more small incisions to accommodate the instruments used to repair the shoulder. These instruments can shave, trim, cut, stitch, or smooth the damaged areas.

Arthroscopic shoulder surgery is often performed in an outpatient surgery center, which means no overnight hospital stay is required. You report to the surgical center in the morning, undergo the procedure, and – following a recovery period under the care of medical professionals – return home later in the day.

Postoperative Care

After surgery, you will be transported to the recovery room for close observation of your vital signs and circulation. You may remain in the recovery room for a few hours.

When you leave the hospital, your arm will be in a sling. The sling should be worn for the amount of time recommended by your physician.

Rehabilitation

Steps for rehabilitation following rotator cuff surgery and instability repair vary from physician to physician. To learn what activities will be involved in your own rehabilitation, consult your doctor.

All information provided on this website is for information purposes only. Every patient’s case is unique and each patient should follow his or her doctor’s specific instructions. Please discuss nutrition, medication and treatment options with your doctor to make sure you are getting the proper care for your particular situation. If you are seeking this information in an emergency situation, please call 911 and seek emergency help.

Our Awarded Sports MedicineTeam

Thomas F. Burke, MD

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About Dr. Burke

Orthopedics Surgeon
Specializing in: Sports Medicine, Arthroscopy,
Trauma & Fracture Care, Shoulder Reconstruction

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James A. Karlson, MD

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About Dr. Karlson

Orthopedic Surgeon
Specializing in Sports Medicine Including:
Knee, Hip, Ankle, and Shoulder injuries

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Glen Ross, MD

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About Dr. Ross

Orthopedic Surgeon
Specializing in Sports Medicine, Shoulder & Elbow

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Anthony J. Schena, MD

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About Dr. Schena

Orthopedic Surgeon
Specializing in Sports Medicine, General Orthopedics (Knee, Shoulder, and Joint Reconstruction)

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Trusted by Top Teams & Healthcare Institutions

Boston Celtics Team Physicians
Top Orthopedic Doctors in Boston, MA

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